Massachusetts lawmakers exonerated Elizabeth Johnson Jr. of her 1693 witchcraft conviction, which she was sentenced to death for, with a curious eighth grade class sparking the late move.

During the Salem witch trials 329 years ago, 19 convicted "witches" were hanged and a man was crushed to death with rocks, according to a report.

Johnson, convicted at 22, was never executed despite her sentence. Then-Gov. William Phips intervened in her hanging as the magnitude of the witch hunt and its consequences became clearer.

'SURVIVOR MODE': UVALDE SURVIVOR SMEARED HERSELF IN FRIEND'S BLOOD AND PLAYED DEAD

There is no record of if she ever married or had children or when she died, but it is assumed to have been in the 1700s.

Several convicted witches were exonerated in the years following, but Johnson was left out.

Witch Pardon
Karla Hailer, a fifth grade teacher from Scituate, Massachusetts, takes a video where a memorial stands at the site in Salem where five women were hanged as witches more than three centuries years earlier. Stephan Savoia/AP


Eighth graders at North Andover Middle School didn't agree with this and sought justice for the convicted "witch." Civics teacher Carrie LaPierre's students took the time to research what steps were necessary to accomplish their goal.

Democratic state Sen. Diana DiZoglio, on introducing the legislation to clear Johnson's name in August, said, "It is important that we work to correct history.”

“We will never be able to change what happened to these victims, but at the very least, we can set the record straight,” she added.

In a statement, LaPierre praised her students for working so hard on “the long-overlooked issue of justice for this wrongly convicted woman.”

“Passing this legislation will be incredibly impactful on their understanding of how important it is to stand up for people who cannot advocate for themselves and how strong of a voice they actually have," she continued.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

DiZoglio credited the students in part for the measure's passage, saying, "They are to be celebrated for stepping up to the plate and having the courage to be a voice for someone who hasn’t had a voice for so long."

Democratic state Sen. Joan Lovely of Salem added, "For 300 years, Elizabeth Johnson Jr. was without a voice, her story lost to the passages of time.”

LaPierre, her students, and DiZoglio are reportedly being featured in a documentary about Johnson's life.